Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Tips To Traveling Internationally With Diabetes

 

Between tracking affordable flights, researching your destination, and reservations, a lot of planning requires. Add to that the management of diabetes and preparing for a trip can sometimes feel challenging. But with a little expert planning, you have no reason to sacrifice your health or your vacation. Follow these guide tips for extra precautions for travel. Consider more tips on safe ways to go beyond your typical eating routine when you’re a journey away.

 

Type-1 diabetic Travelers face a deep range of risks that have a small effect on healthy travelers. Some of those risks include:

 

  • Physical Activity Changes. 
  • Too much or too little sleep.
  • Meals away from your regular diet.
  • Influence of stress

 

 

What You Should do Before Moving:

Your preparation will depend on where you are going & how far you are, but any diabetic traveler should start with these steps:

 

Meal Plan:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Diabetic people are not alone in their frustration with eating a healthy mid-day meal. Many airlines will give you the option to take food according to your health concerns when booking your trip, but if you do not have this option, call the airline. Request a diabetic or vegetarian diet. Many airlines will also offer heart-healthy or low sodium options.

 

If the idea of ​​eating airline food makes your stomach twitch, buy breakfast at the airport. Find nuts, seeds, fruits, yogurt, veggies and dips, sandwiches with lean meats, and salads at various stores. If you don’t bring glucose to treat the bottom, this is also an excellent time to stock up on candy, soda, or juice.

 

 

Carry a Doctor’s Letter Before Travel:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

If you plan, your journey through airport security will be smoother: the need to take your diabetes and insulin, syringes, test strips, and other supplies from your doctor to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Write a warning letter. Also, bring with you pharmacy-labeled pill bottles and insulin vials. You will spend very little time explaining that the thing attached to your stomach is what we call insulin pumps and constant glucose monitors in the diabetes world.

 

Carry insulin:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

It is difficult for people with diabetes to cross the time zone because it requires adjustment in insulin injections and is very individual. That’s why you should discuss your trip to your doctor at least one month before you travel. Commonly with the rest of your healthcare team, they can help you plan your changes to these insulin regimen modifications.

 

Pack your diabetes supplies in your carry-on & make sure:

 

  1. insulin loaded dispensing products such as 
  • Vials
  • jet injectors
  • Bio-injectors
  • EpiPens
  • infusers  
  • Preloaded syringes.
  1. Alcohol swabs, Lancets, blood glucose meter test strips, blood glucose meters, & meter-testing solutions
  2. Insulin pumps and insulin pump supplies cleaning agents, extra batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kits, catheters, and needles such as insulin pumps & supplies must be followed by insulin.
  3. A glucagon emergency kit & Urine ketone test strips.

 

Visit the Doctor:

About 6 to 8 weeks before your trip, visit your endocrinologist and prescription payments, a doctor’s note that can make your journey to airport safety easier, and your medication while traveling in the time zone. Ask for advice on adjusting. It’s also a good idea to ask your doctors for the chemical name of the medicine you are taking, as many countries will bring different prescriptions for the brand names you use. Keep in mind that your body may react abnormally to drugs obtained in a pharmacy in another country as the medicine may be mixed differently, or different supplements may be used. 

 

Pack a Carry-on:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Avoid the temptation to store all of your diabetes supplies in your checked luggage, no matter how heavy the bag may be on your back. Even more troubling is the loss of goods. The safest way to ensure your delivery is to have them with you during the flight. If you plan to fill the luggage in the box above your seat, place a small bag under the seat in front of you so that you can carry your meter, test strips, syringes and insulin, saline, and high-acting glucose. Easily accessible. However, eating may be delayed due to the commotion. To deal with food insecurity, consider a fast-acting insulin dose after your meal arrives.

 

Prepare Yourself for Emergencies:

Federal regulations require American airlines to carry a medical kit on board, and the law specifies what requirements must be met. But not so for international travel. Overseas regulations are often not as strict as in the United States, and some budget airlines may not even have a medical cut. 

 

Store insulin properly:

Keeping insulin cool is not as impossible as it may seem when you are miles away from the nearest refrigerator or ice machine. Instead of packing coolers with conventional ice packs, which need to be re-frozen when heated, choose cold packs, such as fried goods, which do not require freezing or refrigeration. Run it under cold water for only five to 10 minutes, and the crystals in the bag will keep the insulin cool for hours.

 

Dirty Hands:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

If you spend some time in running water, you may have a problem: you need to check your blood glucose, but there is no way to clean your hands. Stop this scene when you’re camping, hiking, or spending time in a deserted area with a packet of alcohol wipes or wet wipes. Use them to clean up dirt and food debris, such as leftover fruit juice, which can misread your finger before hitting you. If you forgot to wipe, use this trick approved by diabetes teachers, lance your finger, squeeze a drop of blood, then wipe it off. Do this once or twice more before reading to make sure you are not using blood from any dirt on your finger.

 

Mention your Diabetes:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

If you are traveling alone, someone on the plane must find out about your diabetes in an emergency. Alert the flight attendant when you are on board. You don’t have to go into details, but tell him or her that you may need soda or juice if you become hypoglycemic.

 

Cut your Pump:

You may want to consider briefly disconnecting your pump during takeoff and landing. Some studies have shown that a change in flight pressure gives the shoe more insulin. Once the plane has reached its naval altitude, it is safe to reconnect. Check air bubbles due to height changes before reconnecting your pump after takeoff and landing. Rebuke the pump if necessary. Bubbles can cause you to take less medication than you intended.

 

Sea Breeze:

Trapped in the middle of the ocean may not sound like the ideal vacation for many people with medical conditions, but today’s ships are essentially floating metropolises. The following steps will help you stay healthy and safe at sea.

 

Be aware of Alcohol:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Bose flows smoothly into the sea and port, but you will need to speed up. Too much carb alcohol, such as beer or sugar cane, can raise your blood glucose. If you are trying to lose weight, choose water or baking soda instead. Alcoholic beverages are high in calories, so if you have to memorize, choose wine or light beer and avoid anything decorated with a paper umbrella.

 

The downside of drinking alcohol is that it can also lower your blood glucose. This effect can last up to 24 hours. Even more frightening, even a small amount of Alcohol, can eliminate the warning signs of hypoglycemia. If you are going to drink, do not do it on an empty stomach, and check your blood glucose often.

 

Beach Bum:

Living on the beach can take away the stress of your work, but you’ll need to plan for a calm day.

 

Keep Meds & Supplies Cool:

If there is enough heat for you to sit in a swimming suit, it is probably too hot for your insulin, which should be kept at room temperature. Bring cool packs to store your insulin. Cold, frozen air kills insulin. Also, keep your diabetes devices out of the sun in a cool place. Even blood glucose meters do not like extreme temperatures.

 

Consider injections alternative of a Pump:

Many pumps are waterproof, though check your user’s handbook before you jump. Some shoes need you to cut before entering the water; it is usually desirable to suspend your pump for one hour. But even if your pump can handle the sinking, if your day is lying on the sand, the sun can heat the insulin in your taps, on the other hand, you will use injections, the insulin that is kept fresh.

 

Don’t go anywhere barefoot:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

Debris on the beach, sharp shells, bottle caps, and other trash can cut your feet. If you can’t feel the cut due to neuropathy, you may not have a problem until it is too late, and the infection starts. Always wear sandals or water shoes when walking by the beach or stepping under a lake or sea. Check back on foot from the beach.

 

Into the Wild Life:

People with diabetes go on desert trips all the time. Some have gone so far as to cross Mount Everest, the Antarctic climate, & the Sahara Desert.

 

Buy travel insurance:

Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes
Tips to Traveling Internationally with Diabetes

The main reason for buying travel insurance is to cover the premium cost of medical evacuation, which can run to more than 100,000 Dollars. 

 

Note Local Hospitals & Pharmacies:

Digging around for local medical care options is a great idea. Before leaving for your trip, find out which pharmacies and hospitals are closest to your hotel. If you skip this step and are bound, ask the hotel for recommendations. The staff can also help you find a doctor if needed.

 

Get To Know The Embassy:

When traveling abroad, it is essential to know where to go during a medical emergency. Get to know the [American] embassy in the country you are moving to, and make sure it has a health branch. The embassy will have a list of doctors whose Certificates are checked and approved, and those who speak English, if needed, embassy staff can also assist you in medical evacuation.